IDEAS Kids
Effects of IBD Therapy During Pregnancy

Effects of IBD Therapy During Pregnancy

In pregnant women treated for inflammatory bowel diseases, infliximab and adalimumab, but not certolizumab, cross the placenta and are detected in infants up to 6 months after birth, according to the March issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology (CGH). However, they do not appear to cause birth defects, and women who stop taking the drugs during pregnancy are able to start taking them again after delivery.

As therapeutic options for IBD increase, more patients are able to consider pregnancy. Yet it is not clear whether tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitors are transferred to the fetus or cause complications during pregnancy. Two studies provide important new data about placental transfer of anti-TNF agents and their effects on the health of women and newborns.

What are the Effects of IBD Therapy During Pregnancy?

Pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease IBD

The inflammatory bowel disease is chronic inflammatory disease of gastrointestinal tract that include Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis.

Recent advances have provided substantial insight into the maintenance of mucosal immunity and the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease. Cellular programs responsible for intestinal homeostasis use diverse intracellular and intercellular networks to promote immune tolerance, inflammation or epithelial restitution.

Complex interfaces integrate local host and microbial signals to activate appropriate effector programs selectively and even drive plasticity between these programs. In addition, genetic studies and mouse models have emphasized the role of genetic predispositions and how they affect interactions with microbial and environmental factors, leading to pro-colitogenic perturbations of the host commensal relationship.

Crohns and Colitis Awareness Week Peter Margolis

Crohns and Colitis Awareness Week Peter Margolis

Peter Margolis, MD, PhD, is the Co-Principal Investigator of the C3N Project and Scientific Director of The ImproveCareNow Network. Dr. Margolis is also a Professor of Pediatrics and Director of Research at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center in the James M. Anderson Center for Health Systems Excellence. His brother, Jim Margolis, was diagnosed with Crohn’s disease as an adolescent. Join them in spreading awareness by visiting http://improvecarenow.org and http://c3nproject.org, liking us on Facebook and following us on Twitter.